Adopt an Element

periodic table

I recently worked with a teacher at Nimitz Middle School who had her students adopt an element from the periodic table for the purpose of making an advertisement for the element. The students were charged with the goal of “selling” their element.

There are many free periodic table apps out there, but my favorite is The Periodic Table Project . Here is the iTunes description of the app:

Always at the forefront of innovation, the University of Waterloo initiated a collaborative student-design project to celebrate 2011 as the International Year of Chemistry. Chem 13 News together with the Chemistry Department and the Faculty of Science encouraged chemistry educators and enthusiasts worldwide to adopt an element and artistically interpret that element to eventually be brought together in a mosaic of science and art. A year later, with the project complete, we have designs by chemistry students from all Canadian provinces and territories, 20 US states and 14 different countries. Each element captures a unique and creative spark but together they ignite a passion for chemistry.

 

Here’s a screen shot of one of the pictures that students designed:

 

So we downloaded a few periodic table apps and made sure we had saved several web links to various periodic table websites as well. We then asked students to spend day one researching for such things as the symbol for their element, the atomic mass, the number of protons, the cost of the element, the person who discovered and named the element, interesting facts, etc.

 

Day two consisted of directing students to compile all their research, screen shots, and saved pics from day one into a presentation using either Pic Collage, Videolicious, or Skitch. Most students chose Pic Collage.

 

Here is an example of one student’s product using Pic Collage:

 

 

 

Using Animoto

Screen Shot 2012-09-18 at 2.09.27 PM

Animoto is an application available on the web or as an app on mobile devices that allows the user to very quickly make a video that includes music, still images, and video. The basic account is free, and those who thirst for more features may upgrade for a small fee.

I have put together some videos that run through the basics of using Animoto – enjoy!

Making a Video with Animoto

 Finalizing the Video

 How to Share the Video

 Animoto Help and FAQ

Upgrading Your Account

Using Snippets of Videos in Education

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The following post will show you how to download a video from the web, convert the video so that you may import it into Moviemaker, and then edit the video to your liking prior to finalizing the video for classroom use.

Sites I used in the process of making this post:

  • Screencastomatic – for recording my screen during the whole process.
  • My school you tube account for hosting the videos.

Software I downloaded:

 

How to Download a Video from the Web

How to Convert a Video for Use in Windows MovieMaker

How to Edit a Video with Windows MovieMaker

Using Audacity

Here is a screencast that will show you how to use Audacity to produce an mp3 file that could be burned to a CD or shared in Windows Media Player directly from your computer.

You could also use that MP3 file to import into presentations in Moviemaker, PowerPoint, or even into a Web 2.0 site like Animoto.

I used Jing to make the screencast.

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